ArtsMonth Blog

Transitioning to a New Normal

Thursday, Oct 21 | 8 pm | Zoom Online | $25

While the world begins to open again, many organizations are wondering how to move forward. Certain adaptations during the pandemic have helped to grow audiences and expand repertoires and accessibility practices. Join us for a conversation with four organizations – Hula Halau ‘Ohana Holo’oko’a, Artist Repertory Theatre, Children’s Healing Art Project, and RASIKA – as we explore these adaptations and discuss how to move forward to a new and more welcoming “normal.”

Register at: https://bit.ly/creativeimpactseries

This workshop is part of the Creative Impact Workshop series of professional development opportunities for Washington County artists and cultural organizations.

The series is presented by the City of Hillsboro’s Cultural Arts Division, the City of Beaverton Arts Program and Tualatin Valley Creates.

How to Find a Fiscal Sponsor

Thursday, Oct 14 | 4 – 6 pm | Free

Looking for a fiscal sponsor to provide you or your collective legal and tax exempt status? Learn how to find the right fiscal sponsor for your project or organization, how to prepare to approach a fiscal sponsor, and the importance of being mission-aligned.

This free workshop will be held online on Zoom. Register at: https://bit.ly/creativeimpactseries

This workshop is part of the Creative Impact Workshop series of professional development opportunities for Washington County artists and cultural organizations.

The series is presented by the City of Hillsboro’s Cultural Arts Division, the City of Beaverton Arts Program and Tualatin Valley Creates.

10 Ways to Celebrate Hillsboro’s Creative Community This Month!

  1. Join us on October 5 for a Hillsboro Arts Month Kickoff Party from 7 – 9 pm at the Walters Cultural Arts Center (following First Tuesday Art Walk). See this year’s Hillsboro Arts & Culture Endowment Awards at 7 pm, and then join the dance party in the outdoor tent from 7:30 – 9 pm hosted by The Fire DJs.  Longbottom Coffee & Tea will be offering beer, wine, and concessions for sale inside the Walters Lobby. Masks are required. All ages welcome! 
  1. Take a one-day watercolor class at the Catherine Bede Gallery. Catherine Bede is a talented local watercolorist and she’ll teach you how to paint a watercolor from beginning to end in just a couple of hours.
  1. Visit Colours Art Supplies on Main Street and try a new medium. Do you enjoy painting? Consider trying mixed media. Love drawing? Try acrylic painting. The knowledgeable staff at Colours can help you find materials to suit any project.
  1. Enjoy a unique drive-thru Halloween theater experience from Bag&Baggage Productions. Still concerned about sitting next to strangers to see a play? Your local professional theater company is thinking of you! Audience members “attend” from their cars, are prompted to stop, start, press “play” on the audio tracks that come with your ticket, and make your way around the Rice Museum grounds as the show unfolds around and among your vehicles. 
  1. Take a cooking class at the Collective Kitchen.  Have fun making macarons or Decadent Creations famous Drunken Pumpkin Cake or learn how to make Ethiopian cuisine or tamales this October. 
  1. Visit an artist studio (or three) during the Washington County Artists Open Studio Tour. Over 60 local artists open the door to their studio. 
  1. Attend an Opera Matinee. The Portland Opera is returning to the Walters for a show on October 9.  Tickets on sale at Hillsboro-Oregon.gov/WaltersConcerts. 
  1. Go to the Hip2BSquare exhibit opening at Sequoia Gallery + Studios.  Sequoia is one of the participants in the Downtown Hillsboro Art Walk on the first Tuesday of each month. On October 5 from 5 – 8 pm, enjoy the new show at Sequoia Gallery and then check out a few of the other Art Walk locations.
  1. Learn something new—with your family! The Walters is offering two one-day classes on Saturday, October 2: an interactive lecture/demonstration class on Classical Indian Dance for ages 12 to adult and a Family Clay Workshop for ages 8 to adult.  Register at Hillsboro-Oregon.gov/WaltersClasses.  
  1. Listen to live music most nights of the week while you enjoy a slice of wood-fired pizza and drinks at Pizzario. 
  1. Bookmark the events calendar at Tualatin Valley Creates to find creative cultural events in Washington County all year long. 

For more information and to find other arts and cultural events to attend throughout October, visit HillsboroArtsMonth.org

Meet the Artist Pop-ups Scheduled for Two Dates in October

The City of Hillsboro’s Public Art Program invites the public to meet two local public artists and learn about the artwork they made for the City’s collection. On October 10, artist Tim Gabriel will be at the North entrance of the Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve from 10 am – 12 pm to share about his artwork, Steward’s Gateway. Linda Haworth will be at the Hillsboro Civic Center South Plaza on October 23, 10 am – 12 pm, to showcase her artwork, Kids Games. Both events are free and open to all.

Sunday, October 10 | 10 am – 12 pm | Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve – North Entrance

Steward’s Gateway represents the doorway to restoration and stewardship, incorporating cattails and wapato plants as a reminder of the time when the wetlands sustained Native Americans. Visitors will have the opportunity to talk with Gabriel and view his artwork. Information about the wetlands and a family-friendly activity will also be available. Following this event, join Jackson Bottom Wetlands staff at the main entrance at 12 pm for their Wetlands Exploration Days.

Saturday, October 23 | 10 am – 12 pm | Civic Center – South Plaza

Kids Games is a series of glass mosaics that showcase four traditional games that children have played for generations, reinforcing the notion of family, group interaction, and healthy play. Public Art staff and Haworth will be onsite to teach families how to play the games and answer questions. This event takes place during the Hillsboro Farmer’s Market, allowing visitors the opportunity to explore other great offerings from the local community. These events take place during Hillsboro Arts Month, a city-wide celebration of arts and culture. For more information about Arts Month, visit HillsboroArtsMonth.org.

Hillsboro Arts Month Kicks Off with a Community Dance Party at the Walters Cultural Arts Center

October is Hillsboro Arts Month. To get the celebration started, the community is invited to a Hillsboro Arts Month Kickoff Party from 7 – 9 pm at the Walters Cultural Arts Center following First Tuesday Art Walk. See this year’s Hillsboro Arts & Culture Endowment Awards at 7 pm, and then join the dance party in the Walters outdoor tent from 7:30 – 9 pm hosted by the Fire DJs.  Longbottom Coffee & Tea will be offering beer, wine, and concessions for sale inside the Walters Lobby. Arrive early to check out Art Walk in Downtown Hillsboro with music and visual arts at a variety of local galleries and businesses in the Downtown Cultural Arts District from 5 – 8 pm. Masks are required. All ages welcome!

Looking for other ways to celebrate Arts Month in October? Here are 10 other things you can do:

  1. Take a one-day watercolor class at the Catherine Bede Gallery. Catherine Bede is a talented local watercolorist and she’ll teach you how to paint a watercolor from beginning to end in just a couple of hours. CatherineBedeGallery.com/Classes
  2. Visit Colours Art Supplies on Main Street and try a new medium. Do you enjoy painting? Consider trying mixed media. Love drawing? Try acrylic painting. The knowledgeable staff at Colours can help you find materials to suit any project. ColoursArt.com
  3. Enjoy a unique drive-thru Halloween theater experience from Bag&Baggage Productions. Still concerned about sitting next to strangers to see a play? Your local professional theater company is thinking of you! Audience members “attend” from their cars, are prompted to stop, start, press “play” on the audio tracks that come with your ticket, and make your way around the Rice Museum grounds as the show unfolds around and among your vehicles. BagNBaggage.org
  4. Take a cooking class at the Collective Kitchen.  Have fun making macarons or Decadent Creations famous Drunken Pumpkin Cake or learn how to make Ethiopian cuisine or tamales this October.  Collective Kitchen.net
  5. Visit an artist studio (or three) during the Washington County Artists Open Studio Tour. Over 60 local artists open the door to their studio.  WashCoArt.org
  6. Attend an Opera Matinee. The Portland Opera is returning to the Walters for a show on October 9.  Tickets on sale at Hillsboro-Oregon.gov/WaltersConcerts.
  7. Go to the Hip2BSquare exhibit opening at Sequoia Gallery + Studios.  Sequoia is one of the participants in the Downtown Hillsboro Art Walk on the first Tuesday of each month. On October 5 from 5 – 8 pm, enjoy the new show at Sequoia Gallery and then check out a few of the other Art Walk locations. SequoiaGalleryStudios.org
  8. Learn something new—with your family! The Walters is offering two one-day classes on Saturday, October 2: an interactive lecture/demonstration class on Classical Indian Dance for ages 12 to adult and a Family Clay Workshop for ages 8 to adult.  Register at Hillsboro-Oregon.gov/WaltersClasses.
  9. Listen to live music most nights of the week while you enjoy a slice of wood-fired pizza and drinks at Pizzario.  Pizzariopdx.com
  10. Bookmark the events calendar at Tualatin Valley Creates to find creative cultural events in Washington County all year long.  TVCreates.org/Calendar-Of-Events

Hillsboro Arts Month is an initiative of the Hillsboro Arts & Culture Council, designed to highlight the creative community of the City of Hillsboro. For more information and to find other arts and cultural events to attend throughout October, visit HillsboroArtsMonth.org.

Creative Placemaking Links Art and Community Revitalization

As sculptor Dee Briggs walked through the vacant house that she planned to have demolished next to her studio, she was struck by the evidence of the many lives that had been spent there. As she looked through the personal items left behind and pondered those lived experiences, she changed her original plan and decided to paint the house gold and carefully deconstruct it, saving those materials to eventually be reborn as a coffee house with the goal of providing jobs and a gathering place. Her sense of connection and commitment to her local community in Wilkinsburg, Pa, and the steps she took to enhance the location were labeled creative placemaking, a phrase which is linked to a wide network of programs aimed at revitalizing vacant properties in ways that also model inclusive community development. As a result, it can expand equitable development opportunities for low-income people living in disinvested communities.

With this idea in mind that art can fuel community development, Power House Productions, an artist-run neighborhood-based nonprofit in Detroit, Michigan, was created with the intention to build relationships in the community and revitalize neighborhoods. Instead of breaking down a vacant house as Dee Briggs did in Wilkinsburg, here vacant, abandoned, and fire damaged homes were renovated in collaboration with local artists and turned into centers for neighborhood creativity. With these projects, Power House seeks to “integrate contemporary art and artistic practices into the daily life of (its) diverse Detroit neighborhood, creating public spaces for the exchange of ideas, opinions, and experiences.” Currently five house have been renovated for community use, along with a public park that now combines skateboarding, public art, and green space.

As the Trust for Public Land (TPL) indicates, though, the focus of creative placemaking goes beyond vacant properties. TPL describes it as “a cooperative, community-based process that leads to new and rejuvenated parks and open spaces that reflect local identity through arts and culture. It has five components: equity, arts and culture, community engagement, partnerships, and stewardship.”

The Mid-America Mural Project was developed in 2010 with the intention to create “meaningful and high quality works through a collaborative process driven by local people.” Each mural project includes the guidance of professional artists, with every stage of the project connecting community members with an opportunity for hands-on experience in research, design, and execution of major public artworks. Two months after a devastating tornado, residents of Joplin, Missouri worked together to create a mural focused on rebuilding, remembering, and moving forward. “Inspired by the metamorphosis of butterflies, the poetry of Langston Hughes, and the capacity for renewal expressed in the imaginations of children, the mural captures the story of Joplin’s unbroken spirit and hopeful outlook after the storm.” The Mural Project has helped the communities of Arkadelphia, Arkansas; Waco, Texas; Hastings, Nebraska; Newton, Kansas; and Tonkawa, Oklahoma to create their own similarly meaningful community murals.

The impacts of creative placemaking can be seen from Los Angeles to Denver, New Jersey to Chicago, and Nashville to Philadelphia along with many other communities. Whether it is protecting “sacred spaces,” recovering the potential of abandoned land, revitalizing neighborhoods, or just bringing people together, creative placemaking offers exciting cooperative opportunities to blend art and diverse communities.

Read more about these projects and about creative placemaking here:

www.nextcity.org/daily/entry/what-if-all-community-development-started-with-local-arts-and-culture

www.powerhouseproductions.org

www.midamericamuralproject.blogspot.com/p/mural-gallery.html

www.kresge.org/news/whom-whom-series-explores-how-creative-placemaking-playing-integral-role-equitable-community

www.tpl.org/our-work/creative-placemaking

www.creativeplacemaking.t4america.org/placemaking-in-practice/nashville-gets-more-than-a-crosswalk/

www.nextcity.org/daily/entry/philadelphia-based-artists-fill-walls-with-hope-and-public-safety-know-how

Has Your Doctor Taken an Art Class? Why That Could be Important

Medical school training for physicians is all about chemistry, anatomy, and the ‘ologies (biology, physiology, pathology, endocrinology, etc.)…right?

Wrong. There are nearly 70 medical schools in the U.S., as well as in Canada, Australia, and Italy, offering courses in the arts for their students, some of which are part of the mandatory curriculum. The reason? Recent research shows the arts can enhance skills essential to effective and compassionate patient care.

Painting courses may be designed around exercises focused on visual art observation, written assessment, and even attempting to paint in various styles. The instructors, usually doctors themselves, report that this training contributes to developing critical thinking and observational and communication skills, as well as bias awareness and empathy. For example, Dr. Michael Flanagan teaches an “Impressionism and the Art of Communication” seminar to fourth-year medical students at the Penn State College of Medicine. He argues that as a physician, “Our job is to elicit information from our patients. By communicating more effectively and establishing rapport with patients, so they are more comfortable telling you about their symptoms, you are more likely to make the diagnosis and have higher patient satisfaction.” A 2019 study concludes: “Art training in isolation can help teach medical students to become better clinical observers.”

Also at Penn State, Dr. Paul Haidet, professor of medicine, humanities, and public health sciences, teaches a course entitled “Jazz and the Art of Medicine.” Haidet said of the course “Fourth-year medical students learn to use jazz music as a metaphor for improvisational communication with patients….The hardest thing for doctors-in-training to grasp and learn is the ability to connect with the experience of patients.” Jazz music allowed the students to develop new and creative ways to communicate with patients.

As a medical student at Yale, Robert Rock integrated his background in art history to co-develop a workshop called “Making the Invisible Visible (MIV).” According to Rock, “It uses in-depth art observation to challenge and enhance participants’ objectivity in analyzing what they ‘see’ in a painting, and subsequently explore topics of bias, identity, and hierarchies of power in patient-provider interactions.” Dr. Rock also conducted tours of the Yale University Art Gallery with first year medical students and alumni to examine the art with clinical objectivity—the same way physicians examine patients to form a diagnosis. They were challenged to curb their tendency to make quick assumptions, and to consider how their assumptions may be based on biases that persist in society. The MIV course has been incorporated into the mandatory curriculum for all Yale medical students, and Rock is now a family medicine resident at Montefiore Health System, in the Bronx.

These are only a few examples of how the arts are recognized as providing creative and powerful opportunities to enrich and strengthen important skills for future physicians. In our own backyard, the Oregon Health Sciences University course catalog includes “Narrative Medicine” as a training area focused on the ability to listen, absorb, and be moved to action by the stories of illness. Included in elective experience options, students may use visual art or film to consider the experience of illness from multiple perspectives. The intersection of the arts and medicine has a bright future—and one that can greatly benefit patient care.

So, has your doctor taken an art class?

To learn more, read:

Med Schools Requiring Art Classes: www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-med-schools-requiring-art-classes

The Art of Medicine: www.news.psu.edu/story/391687/2016/02/09/academics/art-medicine

Haidet, Colleagues to Study How Arts, Humanities Elevate Medical Education: www.news.psu.edu/story/569365/2019/04/15/music/haidet-colleagues-study-how-arts-humanities-elevate-medical-education

Robert Rock, art, justice, and medicine: www.medicine.yale.edu/news/yale-medicine-magazine/robert-rock-art-justice-and-medicine/

OSHU MD Program Curriculum: www.ohsu.edu/school-of-medicine/md-program/md-program-curriculum

Get to Know the Hillsboro Symphony Orchestra!

The Hillsboro Symphony Orchestra (HSO) comprises more than 70 members and includes volunteers of all ages, backgrounds and occupations. The Orchestra had big plans for this season, including preparations for our 20th anniversary celebration next year. COVID-19 may have put an intermission on our in-person activities, but that doesn’t mean HSO has stopped striving toward our primary purpose of bringing music to the community.

Though rehearsals and performances were on a pandemic time-out for the spring and summer, the HSO board has continued to meet regularly to build a dual strategy for this coming season.

The first part of the plan focuses on the community of musicians that makes up the Hillsboro Symphony Orchestra. The ban on large gatherings, and the initial stay-at-home order followed soon after, created an abrupt and indefinite suspension of HSO activities. Many of our members expressed a sense of loss for a structured time to meet and make music together. Though full, in-person rehearsals are still not feasible for the fall term, weekly gatherings have returned via virtual meeting spaces. Sound delays and synching issues unfortunately makes a traditional rehearsal impractical through online means, but our members enjoy listening and playing along with pre-recorded tracks of music we might perform in the future, viewing short presentations from fellow orchestra members and guests, and having a chance to interact with each other after the long hiatus.

The second part of the plan focuses on engaging with the community at-large. With the support of internal teams made up of member volunteers, HSO is creating content for our new and loyal patrons alike through social media! Members are recording themselves playing in their driveways and on their front porches, telling stories of HSO, and sharing pictures depicting the lives of musicians, which will all culminate in a virtual concert on November 20, 2020.

Hillsboro Symphony Orchestra is looking forward to performing together again. To learn more, visit our website at HillsboroSymphony.org, like us on Facebook (@HillsboroSymphony), and Follow us on Instagram (@HillsboroSymphonyOrchestra).

Professional Theater, Symphonies and a Cultural Arts Center — Oh My!

Did you know that Hillsboro is home to not one, but two local orchestras—the Hillsboro Symphony Orchestra and the Westside Community & Youth Orchestra? Did you know that we have a national award-winning theater company, Bag&Baggage Productions, right in Downtown Hillsboro? Or that you can attend an art opening, live performances, and art classes, all in one place, at the Walters Cultural Arts Center? These are just a few of the arts and cultural opportunities you might be missing right in your hometown.

When the City of Hillsboro was working on our Cultural Arts Action Plan, we surveyed hundreds of community members online and in person at farmers’ markets, libraries, and parks. The surveys revealed a tremendous interest in having arts resources available locally. Survey respondents asked for everything from a children’s museum to more late night dance clubs. Most surprising was how many people asked for resources that already exist! Our everyday lives are so busy, and sometimes the more there is—more sources of information, more things to do—the harder it is to find out about the events you would really like to know about. Our local arts and cultural groups are trying to reach you, through websites, social media, and email lists. They post flyers, send mailers, and buy ads in newspapers—online or in print. Even with all of this effort, there is no way  to reach everyone who may enjoy what they have to offer, whether that be a concert, play, festival, art show, or class.

October is Hillsboro Arts Month and this year, though you may not be able to attend an in person event, celebrate Hillsboro’s arts community by getting to know some of the fantastic local organizations and art-based businesses in your backyard. Some are taking a necessary hiatus from public programs during the pandemic, but you can still learn about them on their website, join their mailing list, or follow them on social media to hear about new events when they are able to return.  Others groups are offering online events—many for free—that you and your entire household could enjoy right now.

We are listing many of the organizations active in our community here. Check them out, start following the organizations that interest you, and, if you are able, consider donating now, to ensure they survive and thrive in our community.

Hillsboro’s Historic Downtown Reveals Its Stories

When you walk through Downtown Hillsboro, you might notice the quaint historic facades, the inviting boutiques, and the tantalizing restaurants, but the Hillsboro Historical Society (HHS) wants you to look beyond that cozy first impression. After years spent in dusty records rooms and leafing through old newspapers, HHS is nearly ready to invite you in, to learn the story of our town—through all the colorful, inspiring personalities that built this community we love.

The first phase of the “Stories on the Streets” project will install 23 signs on the buildings of East Main Street between Second and Third Avenues, featuring a playful spin on Victorian silhouette art, coupled with quirky stories from the past.

Through the “Stories on the Streets” project, you will have a chance to get to know:

  • Orange Phelps: The oldest of the original theater men, a semi-pro baseball catcher, and former Hillsboro mayor.
  • Emma McKinney:  A widowed mother turned newspaperwoman and the namesake of a major national newspaper award.
  • Dr. F.A. Bailey:  A pioneer doctor so dedicated to his patients that he would build rafts during flood season just to reach them.

The Historical Society hopes to offer you the chance to connect with your community through the story of our shared Hillsboro heritage—the story we, ourselves, contribute to every day as we live, work, play, and endure an epidemic…together.

Our hope is that by sharing these tales of our collective past, we can draw people together under a common bond, one of community pride and involvement. We hope, too, that this project will give travelers to the Tualatin Valley a similarly clear sense of this place—a gorgeous town that has inspired generations of entrepreneurs, statesmen, organizers, and artisans.

And, of course, we hope their stories will inspire you, too!

If you would like to sponsor a sign or get involved in the “Stories on the Streets” project, we would love to hear from you. You can reach our President, Dirk Knudsen, at DirkKnudsen@gmail.com. You can also support our work with a membership at HistoricHillsboro.org.